E-Waste News

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Congratulations to the City of Lakewood! Keep Up the Good Work!

The reports for 2014 are in and the city of Lakewood recycled 51% of all of its waste, a significant increase since 2009 when they were at 42%. Not only are they recycling more, but they are saving money while doing it since they are paying less for trash fees. They have incorporated a curbside pickup program for recycling along with several other efforts including working with Accurate IT Services for their electronics recycling drop off program. Thank you, Lakewood, for making Ohio greener and for all your hard work. To read the full article, click the link below.


http://www.onelakewood.com/lakewood-recycling-rates-continue-to-climb/

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KAB Offers Ideas on Boosting Office Recycling

By Jared Paben

 

Offices will generate more recyclable materials and less contamination if each employee is given a large recycling bin and small garbage can, according to a study.

The study, titled "Recycling at Work: Research to Inform Improved Recycling in the Workplace," was commissioned by Keep America Beautiful (KAB) with support from PepsiCo Recycling and commercial real estate giant CBRE.

"It was important to do this because we see recycling in the workplace as a real potential opportunity to increase recycling," said Brenda Pulley, KAB's senior vice president of recycling.

Over six months in 2014, Action Research studied different recycling and garbage bin configurations in CBRE offices in Atlanta, Boston, Houston and San Diego. All offices had single-stream recycling collection.

The stakeholders tried the following configurations at each employee's desk:

  • Small trash can attached to a larger recycling bin
  • Equal-sized recycling and garbage cans
  • Only a recycling bin
  • Making no changes to the existing configuration but providing recycling information

The first configuration, with a small garbage and large recycling bin, showed the greatest success, according to the report. It yielded a higher percentage of recyclable materials and lower percentage of garbage in recycling bins as well as a lower percentage of recyclables in garbage cans.

Before the project, 79 percent of offices had some amount of paper in garbage cans, but the number dropped to almost zero during the experiment, the report stated.

"Our research clearly shows that by combining specific-sized trash and recycling receptacles, with simple signage and messaging, businesses and other organizations can increase employee participation and improve their rate of recycling of office-generated materials," Jennifer Jehn, KAB president and CEO, stated in a press release.

The "recycling-bin-only" option was unsuccessful and might have actually led employees to throw away recyclable materials they would have otherwise diverted, the report noted. It was unpopular for workers, and four offices dropped out of the survey after they were assigned this configuration, the report said.

http://resource-recycling.com/node/5916?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=READ%20MORE%3E%3E&utm_campaign=RRN%2005-05-15

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89% of e-waste is neglected due to mobile phone recycling popularity

by ClickGreen staff. Published Wed 26 Feb 2014

Despite the popularity of the mobile phone recycling industry, handsets only contribute towards a small percentage of the overall E-Waste accumulation. 

According to a study by the US US environmental Protection Agency only 11% of electronic waste is made up of mobile devices, the remaining 89% is computers, accessories, televisions and TV peripherals. 

UK based recyclers Bozowi Sell My Camera stated "Because mobile phone recycling has become such a large business venture over the last decade, people forget that handsets are a relatively small part of e-waste and you should consider recycling all your electrical devices the way you would with your phone."

43% of e-waste accretion is digital accessories and in 2010 this accumulated to a staggering 1,015,000 tons, 9% of which are digital cameras. 

This increasing trend of disposing of cameras is considered to be a by-product of consumers choosing Smartphones over digital cameras. The Telegraph reported that from 2006 to 2011 camera sales dropped by £245 million, which corresponds well the massive increases in smartphone popularity over the last eight years. 

Mintel Technology Analyst Samuel Gee said: "Although smartphone cameras do not typically match the quality of output of dedicated devices, the technology is consistently improving, as the quality of camera image output becomes too high for consumers to reliably distinguish between competitors."

The same report also stated that 21% of camera and camcorder owners agree that smartphones are a better long term investment. 

The managing director of Bozowi responded "We understand better than anyone that mobile phone recycling is the more finically secure route, but us and other recyclers need to start broadening our focus if we genuinely care about the deterioration of e-waste accumulation". 

Bozowi stated that they are developing a more diverse database and campaign that should hopefully encourage people to recycle more electrical appliances than just mobile phones. This campaign will also treat digital camera recycling as one of its primary focus points. 

Copyright

© by ClickGreen staff

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Closed Cincinnati firm leaves behind major CRT stockpile

Closed Cincinnati firm leaves behind major CRT stockpile

By Bobby Elliott and Dan Leif, E-Scrap News

March 7, 2014

E-scrap processor 2TRG has left behind significant tonnages of CRT glass as its former Cincinnati facility, several sources, including the Ohio EPA, have informed E-Scrap News.

After closing the doors to its 11093 Kenwood Road facility in Cincinnati last year, 2TRG, a former R2- and e-Stewards-certified processor, abandoned "tons upon tons of [CRT] glass" in Gaylord boxes, Global Environmental Services (GES) president Kenny Gravitt told E-Scrap News. Apparently unable to pay for downstream processing, 2TRG left at least 1,500 tons of the glass at the facility, Gravitt said.

Another processor who also toured the facility estimated there were upwards of 3,000 tons of intact and crushed CRT glass on-site.

While declining to confirm either estimate, the Ohio EPA did verify the existence of the glass at the former 2TRG facility. "Ohio EPA staff has visited the site," Dina Pierce, the state agency's media coordinator, told E-Scrap News. "Staff saw a large number of Gaylord boxes onsite containing various computer parts (not just CRT glass)."

State rules, according to Pierce and the Ohio EPA, hold both "the owner and operator responsible for appropriate management of CRT glass." With 2TRG no longer in business, the "property owner's representative told our inspectors he intends to take bids for a contract to remove the stockpiled computer materials, including the CRT glass," Pierce said.

Three processors, including GES, told E-Scrap News they had each entered a bid to take over the glass. One processor estimated a cleanup cost of roughly $600,000, while another suggested costs could easily exceed $1 million.

Attempts to contact the property owner and property manager were unsuccessful. Repeated attempts to reach former 2TRG executives, including CFO and founder Carol Weinstein, were unsuccessful.

Pierce told E-Scrap News the Ohio EPA "will monitor and follow up as needed to make sure any hazardous wastes at the site are properly managed and removed."

A number of 2TRG's assets were acquired in December of 2013 by the publicly traded firm E-Waste Systems (EWSI). An EWSI executive told E-Scrap News the acquisition excluded "anything that would have been a liability" and sources indicated 2TRG's CRT glass did not change hands in the deal.

While an increasing number of processors have indicated challenges moving CRTs downstream, 2TRG's alleged misconduct could represent one of the most surprising instances of a trusted and lauded firm unable to figure out how to address CRT management costs. The company had facilities in Geneva, New York and Georgetown, Kentucky in addition to the Cincinnati location.

As reported in this publication, a handful of other e-scrap processors, including some in Arizona, Colorado and Maryland, have also left piles of CRTs in warehouses. However, in comparison with 2TRG, some of those firms were small, underfunded operations. 2TRG was a more sizable industry member. For instance, the firm was previously a member of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries Inc., and the Cincinnati plant was certified under the industry's two hallmark standards, e-Stewards and R2.

Executives at 2TRG have previously stated the firm had annual revenues of more than $5 million annually and its three plants had a total footprint of more than 200,000 square feet.

Copyright

© Bobby Elliott and Dan Leif, E-Scrap News

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Global e-scrap market to quadruple in coming years

Global e-scrap market to quadruple in coming years

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Feb. 28, 2014

The annual e-scrap market is expected to reach nearly $41.4 billion by 2019, more than four times its 2012 value of $9.8 billion.

According to a market report by Transparency Market Research, regulatory improvements, sustainability programs from major manufacturers and "rapid industrialization" will play a major role in driving market growth. While Europe "dominated" e-scrap recycling in 2012, emerging economies in the Asia-Pacific, benefiting from cheap labor and rising access to used electronics, are expected to represent the fastest growing market for e-scrap going forward.

The region, which includes Korea, Taiwan, India, China and Japan, is also noted for its lack of regulatory measures, making it one of the biggest landing spots for e-scrap collected elsewhere.

By volume, the global e-scrap market reached 48.43 million tons of material in 2012. Volumes in 2019 are expected to reach about 141.1 tons, nearly tripling 2012 totals.

By revenue, steel accounted for a little more than a third of global e-scrap revenues. Steel, owing to its value as a recycled commodity, was also the most recycled material in the e-scrap stream during 2012.

Copyright

© Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

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R2 certification hits milestone

R2 certification hits milestone

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Feb. 14, 2014

More than 500 e-scrap recycling facilities around the world are now certified to the R2 standard.

R2 Solutions, the nonprofit organization responsible for developing and administering the standard, announced the news Feb. 7 in a press release. A total of 508 facilities across 14 countries are currently certified and "more are in the pipeline," the release states.

Facilities will have to update their certification this year to meet the recently introduced R2:2013 standard. A 58-page guidance document was released in November to aid firms conform to the changes, which include a requirement for certified facilities to have an environmental health and safety management system in place.

The R2 standard was founded in 2008.

Copyright

© Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

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Contest winners propose nuclear applications for old CRTs

Contest winners propose nuclear applications for old CRTs

By. Dr. Thomas Engelhardt

Last month CEA and the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries Inc. (ISRI) ® announced the winner of the “CRT Challenge.” The goal was to identify financially viable, environmentally conscious proposals for using recycled CRT glass. This CRT challenge was a crowd-sourced technical competition to find new uses for old CRT glass, a powerful way to dispose of old TVs and monitors. 

Dr. Thomas Engelhardt was the winner of the CRT Challenge. Here is an explanation of his winning proposal. 

The disruptive impact of modern flat screen displays on the established recycling system of cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is an interesting example of how technology changes affect manufacturing and the environment.

Since making new CRTs is no longer an option, other uses for this material have to be found. CRT glass contains up to 30 percent lead and could be seen as very rich lead ore, which sounds good, but the glass portion gets in the way. A brilliant way of getting lead out of the CRT glass is being commercialized but requires investing in a dedicated plant. Without new uses, the outlets for recycled lead containing glass are limited and do not allow for processing all the CRT material.

The solution is simple—why not use lead-containing glass in the vitrification process? Vitrification of nuclear waste is a mature technology that has been used for more than 40 years in France, Germany, Belgium, Russia, Japan and the United States. It involves the melting of waste material with glass-forming additives so that the final glassy product immobilizes the waste material, trapping the lead and the other elements in the glass. The Environmental Protection Agency has declared vitrification to be the “best demonstrated available technology” for heavy metals and high-level radioactive waste.

The Hanford vitrification plant in Washington State is projected to produce approximately 160,000 cubic meters of glass material which, at five percent dosage of CRT glass, would consume around 24,000 tons of CRT material. The Hanford Waste Treatment Plant represents a long-term outlet for CRT glass, since operations are planned to run until 2028.

This potential outlet for the CRT waste stream uses established technology and covers the time span relevant for recycling CRT material. The main hurdle will be to qualify the CRT material as a new component in the vitrification process.

Final storage of the vitrified material is done under extremely controlled conditions, which reduces the risk of lead emissions. Safety and environmental aspects of nuclear waste processing and storage may trigger lengthy tests and prevent a fast implementation. Working with an organization such as the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is crucial to identifying the best solution and speeding up the development and testing phase for CRT glass containing vitrification material.

Copyright

© DR. THOMAS ENGELHARDT

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Accurate IT Services Partners with PowerCo Credit Union for Recycling Drive - 6/6/2011

This past Saturday, Accurate IT Services held a recycling drive alongside Columbus Paper Shredding Company at PowerCo Credit Union in Gahanna, OH. PowerCo Credit Union’s first annual Eco Drive not only focused on the electronics and paper recycling, but on the idea of banking itself, offering residents an alternative form of banking.

Accurate IT Services recycled approximately 1200 lbs. of electronic equipment, serving 84 cars in just three hours! Among these electronics was everything from computers to stereo equipment.

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July Commemorative Blow Out Sale!

On June 1st, 2011 Accurate IT Services launched its new website AIT-Recycle.com to refocus  the company on technology recycling. Accurate IT has hple1901wbeen an online retail industry trend setter for years in addition to our professional IT Service division. We are now ready to offer our in-house electronics recycling which has been grown to handle bulk processing for new corporate clients and community services. To celebrate the launch of our new website, Accurate IT is having our largest sale to date!

 

Accurate IT Services already offers the best prices on LCDs, PCs, laptops, on the Internet. Now, we are beating our own prices to commemorate the new website. Whether you need a LCD monitor, a professional grade CRT,  desktop or laptop, we have the right price for you.

Check out www.accurateit.com for full pricing on our inventory.

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Retail Sales

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For over ten years Accurate IT Services has been at the forefront of Internet retail with our value priced LCD monitors, laptops, computers, and professional grade CRT monitors.

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Accurate IT Services offers free drop off your old non mercury technology. Accurate IT pays you for most remarketable technology.

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