E-Waste News

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89% of e-waste is neglected due to mobile phone recycling popularity

by ClickGreen staff. Published Wed 26 Feb 2014

Despite the popularity of the mobile phone recycling industry, handsets only contribute towards a small percentage of the overall E-Waste accumulation. 

According to a study by the US US environmental Protection Agency only 11% of electronic waste is made up of mobile devices, the remaining 89% is computers, accessories, televisions and TV peripherals. 

UK based recyclers Bozowi Sell My Camera stated "Because mobile phone recycling has become such a large business venture over the last decade, people forget that handsets are a relatively small part of e-waste and you should consider recycling all your electrical devices the way you would with your phone."

43% of e-waste accretion is digital accessories and in 2010 this accumulated to a staggering 1,015,000 tons, 9% of which are digital cameras. 

This increasing trend of disposing of cameras is considered to be a by-product of consumers choosing Smartphones over digital cameras. The Telegraph reported that from 2006 to 2011 camera sales dropped by £245 million, which corresponds well the massive increases in smartphone popularity over the last eight years. 

Mintel Technology Analyst Samuel Gee said: "Although smartphone cameras do not typically match the quality of output of dedicated devices, the technology is consistently improving, as the quality of camera image output becomes too high for consumers to reliably distinguish between competitors."

The same report also stated that 21% of camera and camcorder owners agree that smartphones are a better long term investment. 

The managing director of Bozowi responded "We understand better than anyone that mobile phone recycling is the more finically secure route, but us and other recyclers need to start broadening our focus if we genuinely care about the deterioration of e-waste accumulation". 

Bozowi stated that they are developing a more diverse database and campaign that should hopefully encourage people to recycle more electrical appliances than just mobile phones. This campaign will also treat digital camera recycling as one of its primary focus points. 

Copyright

© by ClickGreen staff

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Welcome to Hell: Photographer documents Africa’s e-waste nightmare

By 

Published March 06, 2014

FoxNews.com

 

It used to be wetlands, a recreation zone. Today the locals call it Sodom and Gomorrah.

Slag heaps of rusting electronics, old refrigerators and monitors are scattered everywhere in Agbogbloshie, a dumping ground in Ghana for electronic waste from the rest of the world. On the banks of a polluted river, smoking heaps of burning junk spew bilious, black fumes into the sky. To breathe is to cede years of your life.

The residents of Agbogbloshie are well aware of the poisons in the used electronics they scavenge. But for them, scavenging is the only way to make a buck.

“What you do to get money is what kills you,” one resident said recently. A translator went on to explain, “He knows that, yeah, I’m going to die from this someday. What can I do?”

Another explained the problem in broken English: “We are crying for work, suffering for work. How to eat is hard. There is no job enough, that’s why we come to south. And there is no job to the south. Only this.”

Kevin McElvaney, a 26-year-old business administrator from Germany, recently went to Agbogbloshie to document its ecotech disaster. His portraits show the people working there, mainly kids between 7 and 25, struggling to make a living.

“Before you enter the burning fields of Agbogbloshie, you will recognize a huge market. On one side you can buy cheap local fruits and vegetables and on the other side you will see loads of manufacturers and scrap dealers. Go to these scrap dealers and you will see men sitting on broken TVs smashing their hammers and simple tools against any kind of car parts, machines and electronic devices,” he wrote recently on his blog.

Whose trash is it, anyway?
Over the course of four days, McElvaney met hundreds of young boys and girls, most from the northern part of the country, who came south to burn cables and extract the copper from them. It can be sold on the market for pennies. Monitors can be disassembled to extract bits of precious metals; electronic parts can be removed from gadgets and sold – but at a terrible cost to the human body.

“Injuries like sears, untreated wounds, lung problems, eye and back damages go side by side with chronic nausea, anorexia, heavy headaches,” he wrote.

And where does the trash come from? Despite efforts to police itself, the U.S. contributes as much to the problem as anyone, experts say.

“Much of the incoming material comes from the U.K., but a lot comes from the U.S.,” Jim Puckett, an activist with the non-profit watchdog group Basel Action Network and former toxics director for Greenpeace International, told FoxNews.com by email.

“Last time I was in (nearby) Accra there was a lot of used electronic equipment from the U.S. government arriving there.… When after some time the computers do not sell in the shops, young boys with carts come by and pick them up and take them to the Agbogbloshie wetland/slum area to burn.”

The Basel Convention, organized by the U.N. and adopted in 1989 in Basel, Switzerland, aims to prevent the trade and movement of hazardous electronic wastes. To date, 180 countries and the European Union have signed on to the treaty.

The U.S. signed the treaty in 1990, but Congress never ratified it.

According to State Department policy, shipping electronics for repair, refurbishment or remanufacturing “does not constitute movement of waste, and thus is not impacted by the Convention or its procedures.” In addition, it says, the Convention lacks authority to enforce its own policy.

A number of U.S. businesses have sprung up that export e-waste to other countries -- the repair and remanufacturing the State Department mentions. Good Point Recycling, for example, processes 13 million pounds of electronics annually. Robin Ingenthron, the founder of the company, told FoxNews.com the Basel Convention and overeager activists have led to short-sighted policy. California recently shredded $100 million worth of reusable gear, rather than export it as “e-waste,” he said.

“As someone who lived in Africa for two and a half years,” Ingenthron said, “if you just go to World Bank statistics, Lagos (in Nigeria) had 6.9 million households with televisions in 2007. So what do you expect to see in Lagos dumps?”

And the photos from Agbogbloshie?

“The photos show stuff that’s been there for 15 years,” he said.

Quantifying the problem
Rather than the Basel Convention, the U.S. relies upon the electronics industry to police itself, through guidelines such as the National Strategy for Electronics Stewardship, a 2011 policy document from the EPA. (The EPA did not respond to FoxNews.com questions in time for this article.) It offers recommendations, not regulations.

As a result, activists say, the U.S. is essentially blind to the problem. We have no way to quantify the e-waste we export.

“When a nation ratifies the Basel Convention, they are required to monitor their export of hazardous waste,” said Sarah Westervelt, stewardship policy director with Basel Action Network. “We are not monitoring our export of this particular hazardous waste. We literally are not quantifying it.

“If we were to ratify the convention, we would be required to measure so we could quantify.”

The U.S. recently set out to do that. In December, the National Center for Electronics Recycling, working with researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and funded by the EPA, released a report titled “Quantitative Characterization of Domestic and Transboundary Flows of Used Electronics,” which sought to measure the flow of waste from the U.S.

“We really don’t have a good handle on what exactly … is getting exported every year,” Jason Linnell, executive director of NCER and the report’s author, told FoxNews.com. “We needed to find a good way to get more data about what is actually going out of the country and set up a way to measure things going forward.”

The report found that 66 percent of e-waste in the U.S. is collected, but just 8.5 percent of it is exported as whole products. This represents the low end of what’s being exported, Linnell acknowledged, since the analysis relied on self-reports from the industry. Still, he thinks there has been progress.

Over the last 15 years, he said, “I tend to think the industry has come a long way. Blatant exporting … that’s harder to do now than it ever was.”

But Westervelt blasted the report and its methodology, saying it’s pointless to rely on the industry to report its own exports.

“Unfortunately the report is incredibly flawed,” she said. “When they have this voluntary survey that asks, ‘are you exporting to Africa,’ you’re not going to be getting reliable response.”

No end in sight
Meanwhile the volume of e-waste remains incredibly high. According to EPA estimates, 1.79 million tons were trashed in 2010 -- not including “TV peripherals” like VCRs, DVD players and so on.

And that number has likely soared, thanks to the explosion in mobile phones. But because the U.S. is the only developed country that hasn’t ratified the Basel Convention, it is in a unique position: It’s perfectly legal to load up a container ship with hazardous junk and sell it to the highest bidder. Once the container ship enters international water, though, it falls under the umbrella of international law -- where it’s illegal for about 143 developing countries to accept it. Many do anyway: e-waste is a lucrative business, after all.

“Companies are making money off this on both ends. But they’re causing these irreparable long-term impacts,” Westervelt said.

Ingenthron pointed out that Basel Action Network is one of those companies making money -- its e-Stewards program certifies recyclers and exporters, and charges them a hefty fee to be listed in its database, he alleged.

“They’re charging hundreds of thousands to certify companies for export,” he said. “None of that money goes to Africa.

“And that’s our objection to these photos. Its poverty porn.”

Jeremy A. Kaplan is Science and Technology editor at FoxNews.com, where he heads up coverage of gadgets, the online world, space travel, nature, the environment, and more. Prior to joining Fox, he was executive editor of PC Magazine, co-host of the Fastest Geek competition, and a founding editor of GoodCleanTech.

Copyright

© Jeremy KaplanHow Green - FoxNews.com

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Global e-scrap market to quadruple in coming years

Global e-scrap market to quadruple in coming years

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Feb. 28, 2014

The annual e-scrap market is expected to reach nearly $41.4 billion by 2019, more than four times its 2012 value of $9.8 billion.

According to a market report by Transparency Market Research, regulatory improvements, sustainability programs from major manufacturers and "rapid industrialization" will play a major role in driving market growth. While Europe "dominated" e-scrap recycling in 2012, emerging economies in the Asia-Pacific, benefiting from cheap labor and rising access to used electronics, are expected to represent the fastest growing market for e-scrap going forward.

The region, which includes Korea, Taiwan, India, China and Japan, is also noted for its lack of regulatory measures, making it one of the biggest landing spots for e-scrap collected elsewhere.

By volume, the global e-scrap market reached 48.43 million tons of material in 2012. Volumes in 2019 are expected to reach about 141.1 tons, nearly tripling 2012 totals.

By revenue, steel accounted for a little more than a third of global e-scrap revenues. Steel, owing to its value as a recycled commodity, was also the most recycled material in the e-scrap stream during 2012.

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© Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

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MIT/NCER release study on electronics recycling

MIT/NCER release study on electronics recycling

Trade groups respond to the study, which says 90 percent of electronics collected in the U.S. are recycled domestically.

DECEMBER 20, 2013
 
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Materials Systems Laboratory and the U.S. National Center for Electronics Recycling (NCER) have released Quantitative Characterization of Domestic and Transboundary Flows of Used Electronics, a study that analyses the generation, collection and export of obsolete electronics generated in the United States. 


The study was completed under the umbrella of the StEP initiative—a partnership of several UN organizations, industry, government and international organizations, NGOs and the science sector—and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in support of the U.S. government’s National Strategy for Electronics Stewardship. 

According to the report, it “presents the results of an effort to calculate quantities of used electronics (as whole units) generated and collected in the United States and exported from the United States.” The authors calculated generation and collection quantities using “a sales obsolescence method that included uncertainty,” while export quantities were calculated based on trade data. “The advantage of the trade data approach is that trade data for all types of electronic products is widely available (including extensive historical data), updated relatively frequently and provides insight into the destinations of products,” the authors note. 

Jane Nishida, acting assistant administrator of EPA’s Office of International and Tribal Affairs, says, “We are pleased that StEP, working with the MIT and the NCER, was able to deliver a report that provides a scientific-based approach to generating information on U.S. exports of used electronics.”

According to the study, about 258.2 million units of used electronic were generated in the United States in 2010, of which 171.4 million units were collected. Export flows were estimated at 14.4 million units, or 8.5 percent of the collected estimate on average, the study notes. By weight, 1.6 million tons of used electronics were generated domestically in 2010, with 0.9 million tons collected for recycling. Of the collected electronics, 26,500 tons were exported, which is 3.1 percent of the electronics collected by weight. 

The study adds, “While the total quantity of used electronics exports reported here is most likely an underestimate due to the likelihood that some shipments of whole units are not reported using the proper trade codes, the proportions of exports to world regions is likely accurate.” 

According to the study, mobile phones dominate generation, collection and export on a unit basis, while television sets and monitors dominate on a weight basis. 

The Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), Washington, D.C., says it has welcomed the new report. According to ISRI, “This study, along with similar reports by the U.S. International Trade Commission and the International Data Corp., provide irrefutable evidence that used electronics products are being reused and recycled in America, not ‘dumped’ into developing countries as proponents of export controls have argued for years.”

Robin Wiener, president of ISRI, says, “This latest study adds to the growing body of evidence that the U.S. electronics recycling industry is flourishing, recycling used electronics right here in America. Over the past 10 years this market has shown tremendous growth, and, today, American recyclers have the know-how, the technology and the capacity to handle the growing stream of used electronics products collected domestically.”

ISRI adds that the EPA estimates that only 25 percent of eligible used household electronics products are being collected for recycling. “Figuring out a way to pull that remaining 75 percent out of the basements and garages of homes throughout America, as well as preventing the material from being disposed of in landfills, provides the largest opportunity for increasing the recycling of used electronics in the U.S. and thus increasing jobs in the domestic electronics recycling industry,” Wiener says.

To address the opportunities recycling holds, ISRI recently launched Project Reboot, an effort to educate consumers on the importance of responsibly recycling used electronics and make them aware of opportunities for recycling within their communities. 

The steering committee for the Coalition for American Electronics Recycling (CAER), which says it represents “U.S. companies that believe electronics recycling should be performed securely and sustainably, for the benefit of the American economy,” sent Recycling Today a statement in response to the release of MIT/NCER study and ISRI’s comments that reads:


“The new MIT/NCER study provides valuable insights into the dramatic growth of electronic waste around the world. However on the issue of exports, the study does not provide a sound platform for policy makers. As the authors note: ‘gaps in available data mean that the export quantities represent a lower bound. This is due to a lack of explicit data on used whole unit trade flows, which necessitates several key assumptions in the methodology. Therefore, it is important that other approaches be used to estimate export flows and compared with the quantities calculated in this report. This would provide insight into the magnitude of the error derived from the data gaps.

“As the largest representative body of electronics recyclers in the country, CAER members support the Responsible Electronics Recycling Act (HR 2791) based on our real world experience in the marketplace. As the researchers acknowledge, transboundary flows of e-waste are highly complex and we would welcome an opportunity to collaborate as this issue continues to evolve. 

“While we disagree with ISRI on RERA, we support their efforts to increase consumer recycling here in the U.S. through Project Reboot. We strongly agree that increasing the current 25 percent recycling rate must be a top priority.”

Copyright

© Recycling Today Staff

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Trash or Treasure?

Trash or Treasure?

As Rep. Gene Green prepares to reintroduce the Responsible Electronics Recycling Act, a recent study says such legislation would generate numerous jobs in the U.S. However, the proposed legislation still has detractors.

Curt Harler – Recycling Today

APRIL 1, 2013

Electronics are part of our everyday waste stream. Many government officials say they feel the improper disposal of such devices presents a risk to both American jobs and to the world’s environment.

To that end, a bill known as the Responsible Electronics Recycling Act (RERA) was introduced in Congress as HR 2284 in June 2011 by Texas Rep. Gene Green, a Democrat, with 14 Republicans and nine Democrats signing on as co-sponsors. However, it died in committee. According to his office, Green will reintroduce the measure in this session of Congress. The bill restricts exports of untested and nonworking electronics from the U.S. to developing countries, though it would still allow free trade of tested and working used electronics being exported for reuse.

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Accurate IT Services Collects 40,000 lbs of E-Waste at Columbus Zoo Event

Accurate IT Services Collects 40,000 lbs of E-Waste at Columbus Zoo Event

This past weekend, Accurate IT Services, in conjunction with the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, held a two-day electronics recycling drive at the Columbus Zoo.

Between Saturday and Sunday, 482 vehicles passed through the Columbus Zoo’s parking lot to recycle their old computers, televisions, cell phones, and much more! As a result, 40,000 lbs. of e-waste was diverted from Ohio landfills, including 125 CRT televisions. People came from all around Ohio and its surrounding states to recycle their electronics and assist the Columbus Zoo in their sustainability initiatives.

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Saturday Electronics Recycling Will Keep Hazardous Waste Out of Landfills

Saturday Electronics Recycling Will Keep Hazardous Waste Out of Landfills

Tabitha Clark - Marion Star

MARION - While many people have opinions about the junk that is shown on television today, few understand the junk inside a television can be dangerous if not disposed of properly.

That's why the Delaware Knox Marion Morrow Solid Waste District is sponsoring a TV and electronics recycling day from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at the Marion County Fairgrounds.

"We're mainly collecting televisions," said Angie Carbetta of the Marion County Recycling and Litter Prevention program. "It is such a problem item to recycle. They cost money to process, and there is nowhere to recycle televisions in Marion."

There will be a $10 fee at the drop-off to recycle televisions. There is no charge for other electronics.

While this collection day will take all electronics, it is a special collection to focus on televisions and raise awareness about electronics waste.

Recycling electronics and televisions saves landfill space, keeps toxins out of the environment and recovers precious metals and recyclable plastic, Carbetta said.

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Green Jobs and Other Benefits of E-Waste Recycling

Green Jobs and Other Benefits of E-Waste Recycling

By Drew Hendricks – National Geographic

E-waste has become a serious threat to our environment as more and more gadgets are thrown out after usage into dustbins. This leads to toxic pollution, as electronics break down and release heavy metals, flame retardants, and other chemicals into soil and water.

To address the problem, environmentalists have been pushing for laws in the U.S. and abroad that require companies that manufacture cell phones, computers, and other electronic gadgets to recycle their own e-waste. In fact, responsibly recycling e-waste is a growing field that is providing new green jobs and keeping toxic chemicals out of our land and water.

India is thought to process around eight hundred thousand tons of e-waste every year. However, in that country there are only a few recycling firms registered under the government to process e-waste, meaning a lot of used electronic gadgets are dismantled and dumped in the informal sector, sometimes without proper care to protect laborers or the environment from toxic components.

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Finding Top-Tier Electronics Recyclers - The R2 Standard

Finding Top-Tier Electronics Recyclers - The R2 Standard

Until recently, municipalities, businesses and residents seeking recycling services for used electronic equipment had very few assurances that electronic scrap would be handled correctly by their chosen recycler. Aside from a recycler’s promise, how would consumers of electronics recycling services know claims of environmental and social responsibility were authentic? Large corporations would sometimes take on the expense of auditing a recycler, and possibly even the recycler’s downstream vendors. However, this is a time consuming and expensive process that too few customers had the resources to perform. A certification program specifically designed for the electronics recycling industry was clearly needed. There was rising industry support to develop a standard that would effectively address the operational and materials management concerns associated with electronics recycling activities, and give customers confidence that their electronic equipment was being responsibly recycled.

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Out with the Old and In with the New

Out with the Old and In with the New

 As the holiday season approaches, many will find a new computer, laptop, or LCD monitor or TV under their tree. And, as they unwrap their presents and discover these new electronics, their immediate response will not be “How do I recycle my old one?” However, after a couple weeks or months of sitting under a desk or in a garage, the time will finally come when the old PC, LCD, or gaming system will become “e-waste” and needs to be disposed of properly.

 That is where Accurate IT Services comes in. We recycle all electronics, from computers and laptops to televisions, cell phones, and all-around IT scrap. We are an R2-certified electronics recycler in Columbus, OH that can offer a free recycling service for most electronics. More importantly, we are able to offer upfront payment for remarketable electronic equipment.

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The Certification Papers Are In!

The Certification Papers Are In!

On October 26th, 2011, Accurate IT Services received their official certificates for ISO 14001 and Responsible Recycling (R2)!
 

Columbus, OH’s electronics recycler Accurate IT completed their certification process at the end of August and has since been waiting on the official certificates. These certificates are evidence that Accurate IT’s operation is an environmentally-friendly and safe one dedicated to recycling electronics in a responsible and secure manner. The R2 standard represents Accurate IT Services’ adherence to the ever-changing electronics recycling world, proving that due diligence must be done on downstream vendors to ensure that all electronics are being recycled in a responsible fashion.

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Upcoming Recycling Events in Central Ohio!

Upcoming Recycling Events in Central Ohio!

On Saturday, October 29th, Accurate IT Services will be holding an e-waste recycling drive in West Jefferson, Ohio. This event will be held across the street from the village hall at 28 East Main St. from 9am to 1pm. All electronic equipment will be accepted free of charge excluding televisions, with which there is a $15 recycling fee. So bring your computers, printers, cell phones, and home electronics out and recycle them with Accurate IT!

On Friday, November 18th, Accurate IT Services will have a table set up at Marion County Recycling & Litter Prevention’s Second Annual Eco-Art Fest selling e-waste art and educating the public about the importance of electronics recycling. This event will be held at Marion’s historic Palace Theatre from 12pm to 7:30pm and will feature unique eco-art, including that of some Accurate IT employees. For more information, please contact Angela Carbetta at 740.223.4120 or at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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Locally Owned and Operated

Locally Owned and Operated

For four years, Accurate IT Services has been servicing the Central Ohio region with all their electronics recycling, asset recovery, and data destruction needs. And why not? We are a Columbus company minority owned and veteran operated who employs Columbus residents. As our business grows alongside a booming e-waste market, we would like to continue to serve our dedicated customers throughout Columbus and the region with free pickups, payment for electronic equipment, and guaranteed asset recovery and data destruction.

In addition, we have the capacity to reach across Ohio, servicing companies from Cleveland and Toledo to Cincinnati and Athens and everywhere in between. We regularly hold e-waste recycling drives throughout Ohio, servicing and putting money back into communities that have no other outlet for electronics. Furthermore, we now offer a zero-landfill box program for residential and business customers nationwide. Check out our “Services” page for more information.

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Division of Recycling & Litter Prevention Recognizes Accurate IT Recycling Services in Marion

Division of Recycling & Litter Prevention Recognizes Accurate IT Recycling Services in Marion

Marion County Recycles Electronic Waste

-Over 19,000 lbs collected


Marion collaborated with local businesses to collect more than 19,480 pounds of electronic waste at its event on June 11. The Marion County Recycling & Litter Prevention Office partnered with Buffalo Wild Wings, Perkins Family Restaurant, Accurate IT, City of Marion, Marion County Commissioners, Marion County Council on Aging, and Servex Electronics to assist in this collection event.201120Marion20Recycling20Sign

"This is the first ever TV collection in the county. More and more recycling centers and landfills are refusing to take televisions because they are a hazard and expensive to safely process." - Angela Carbetta, Recycling Coordinator for Marion County Recycling & Litter Prevention


This electronics drop off event was open to businesses and schools instead of just residents. Accurate IT Recycling Services of Columbus collected all types of electronics for free, except for televisions. Because of the costs of processing, there was a $15 recycling fee for TVs.

Participants received food coupons from Buffalo Wild Wings and Perkins and a chance to enter a drawing for a flat-screen television from Servex Electronics.

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Federal Legislation on E-Waste Recycling

Federal Legislation on E-Waste Recycling

Recently, the Responsible Electronics Recycling Act of 2011 was introduced with bi-partisan support in both the U.S. House and Senate. In short, the bill would make it illegal to send toxic e-waste to developing nations. Toxic e-waste includes, among others, waste Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs), waste batteries, and items containing mercury. These materials are essentially the “Focus Materials” defined in the Responsible Recycling (R2) standard developed by the EPA.

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Lack of Ohio E-Waste Regulations

Lack of Ohio E-Waste Regulations

Many states have recently developed regulations stating that certain non-working and obsolete electronic products must be treated as hazardous waste if intended for disposal. However, Ohio is not one of those states. As of 2008, ten states have state legislation regarding the disposal of e-waste. Furthermore, obsolete electronics that contain Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and mercury are considered hazardous waste under federal regulations. However, these regulations do not apply to “small quantity generators” like household sources of electronics. Therefore, it is perfectly legal to throw electronic waste in the trash in most states.

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Recycling with us pays!

Recycling with us pays!

The slogan plastered across our website, truck, and business cards is a testament to our unique practice within our field. While most electronics recycling companies charge for their services, we offer ours free of charge to businesses, schools, and other organizations. In addition, the public is free to drop off all electronics, excluding CRT monitors and televisions, for no charge. More importantly, we are sometimes even able to pay the customer for remarket able equipment! Here at Accurate IT Services we attempt to find the value in all of our customers’ e-waste goods to maximize their asset return.

So how does this work, you ask? At Accurate IT Services, we will do an on-site value assessment of electronic equipment to determine its “remarketability.” We base our assessment on the age, condition, and specifications of the product. For instance, if a product is within four years of age, in good condition, and has remarketable specifications, there will most certainly be a payout. We base our payout scale on the remarket value of the product and provide the customer with a percentage of that, much like secondhand clothing stores or consignment shops.

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An Update on Accurate IT Services Recycling Certifications

An Update on Accurate IT Services Recycling Certifications

As you may have already noticed, there are two very distinct logos at the bottom of our website. These logos indicate the certifications we are reaching for. Though we are not certified yet, all development, implementation, and maintenance of R2 and ISO 14001 standards are in effect throughout our operation. The final stage in our certification process is the Stage 2 Audit, which is scheduled for early August.

First, the ISO 14001 standard deals with the development, implementation, and maintenance of an Environmental Management System (EMS). This EMS allows the company to strive for the continual improvement of its operation and its footprint on the environment. This is primarily done through the establishment of objectives, targets, and their subsequent environmental management programs.

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Marion County's first TV drop-off a success

Marion County's first TV drop-off a success

MARION - Organizers of the first Marion County recycling collection to allow televisions didn't know what to expect before Saturday.

They quickly discovered it would be a success when they saw a line of vehicles waiting an hour before they opened in front of Buffalo Wild Wings and didn't see the line slow down throughout the afternoon.

Marion County Recycling and Litter Prevention partnered with the city and Accurate IT Recycling Services of Columbus to collect all types of electronics including computers and televisions. MCRLP Director Angie Carbetta said it was the first time a collection in the county accepted televisions, widely not accepted because they are a hazard and expensive to process.

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Collection event in Marion will take TVs; electronics from schools and businesses! Saturday June 11th

MARION - An electronics drop off Saturday will be the first opportunity for a television collection in the county and is open to businesses and schools instead of just residents.
Accurate IT Recycling Services of Columbus is collecting all types of electronics, free for every device except televisions.
Because of the costs of processing, there is a $15 recycling fee for TVs.
Mayor Scott Schertzer connected with the Marion County Recycling and Litter Prevention to get the collection organized, he said.
"Recycling is not mandatory, but generally people think it's a good thing to do," he said.
He was looking to get more people to participate in curbside recycling, and the idea blossomed out of that with investigation into the city's recycling program, Schertzer said.
Most drop offs where electronics are accepted are restricted to residential services. This one will be open to all kinds of businesses and schools.
"It's a good thing for everybody when we recycle," he said.

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For over ten years Accurate IT Services has been at the forefront of Internet retail with our value priced LCD monitors, laptops, computers, and professional grade CRT monitors.

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