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Delaware Electronics Recycling Drive!

Delaware Electronics Recycling Drive!

Come to the Delwaware County Fairgrounds this Saturday, October 14th, between 9am and 1pm to drop off your old electronics for responsible recycling!  Accurate IT Services is locally owned, operated, and R2 Certified in Columbus, OH.  This ensures that your equipment will be handled securely, responsibly, and never see a landfill.  We can accept most electronics and small appliances free of charge.  CRT and DLP Rear-Projection televisions will be accepted for a fee of $20 per unit.  CRT monitors will be accepted at $5 a unit.  Exposed tubes will not be collected for safety reasons.  Also, we cannot accept alkaline batteries (AA, AAA, C, D, etc) or light bulbs of any kind.  Any equipment containing refrigerant is also not accepted, including air conditioners. For more information on the items we can accept, please visit our website’s items accepted page at: http://www.ait-recycle.com/recycling-items-accepted  (reduced rates for this event only)

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Woman Recycles Apple Computer Worth 200K in California

Woman Recycles Apple Computer Worth 200K in California

A rare Apple computer from 1976 was recycled in California by a woman cleaning out her garage. Little did she know, that computer was one of only two hundred that were made by Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and Ron Wayne. Now the company is on the hunt to find this woman, who did not leave any information when she dropped off the computer, and he remembers her well. According to the company, all she needs to do is stop by the warehouse to claim 100K, her half of the proceeds.

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CRT glass processor hit with $120,000 fine

CRT glass processor hit with $120,000 fine

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

March 20, 2014

An Arizona plant operated by Pennsylvania-based Dlubak Glass has been hit with a $120,000 fine for improper storage and recycling of CRTs.

During a routine inspection of the company's Yuma, Arizona plant, Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) officials discovered broken CRT glass "throughout the five-acre facility," an ADEQ press release states. Soil stains were also detected, with lead levels "as much as 75 times more than the maximum federal and state exceedance level of five milligrams per liter."

In court, the company agreed to pay the $120,000 fine and store all glass indoors in clearly marked containers. Soil cleanup has also been performed.

Yuma is also the site of a now-notorious CRT abandonment by Dow Management in 2013. Approximately 3,000 tons of glass were left behind by Dow and a "voluntary" cleanup process has been undertaken by the company's former suppliers, ADEQ told E-Scrap News.

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© Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

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Welcome to Hell: Photographer documents Africa’s e-waste nightmare

By 

Published March 06, 2014

FoxNews.com

 

It used to be wetlands, a recreation zone. Today the locals call it Sodom and Gomorrah.

Slag heaps of rusting electronics, old refrigerators and monitors are scattered everywhere in Agbogbloshie, a dumping ground in Ghana for electronic waste from the rest of the world. On the banks of a polluted river, smoking heaps of burning junk spew bilious, black fumes into the sky. To breathe is to cede years of your life.

The residents of Agbogbloshie are well aware of the poisons in the used electronics they scavenge. But for them, scavenging is the only way to make a buck.

“What you do to get money is what kills you,” one resident said recently. A translator went on to explain, “He knows that, yeah, I’m going to die from this someday. What can I do?”

Another explained the problem in broken English: “We are crying for work, suffering for work. How to eat is hard. There is no job enough, that’s why we come to south. And there is no job to the south. Only this.”

Kevin McElvaney, a 26-year-old business administrator from Germany, recently went to Agbogbloshie to document its ecotech disaster. His portraits show the people working there, mainly kids between 7 and 25, struggling to make a living.

“Before you enter the burning fields of Agbogbloshie, you will recognize a huge market. On one side you can buy cheap local fruits and vegetables and on the other side you will see loads of manufacturers and scrap dealers. Go to these scrap dealers and you will see men sitting on broken TVs smashing their hammers and simple tools against any kind of car parts, machines and electronic devices,” he wrote recently on his blog.

Whose trash is it, anyway?
Over the course of four days, McElvaney met hundreds of young boys and girls, most from the northern part of the country, who came south to burn cables and extract the copper from them. It can be sold on the market for pennies. Monitors can be disassembled to extract bits of precious metals; electronic parts can be removed from gadgets and sold – but at a terrible cost to the human body.

“Injuries like sears, untreated wounds, lung problems, eye and back damages go side by side with chronic nausea, anorexia, heavy headaches,” he wrote.

And where does the trash come from? Despite efforts to police itself, the U.S. contributes as much to the problem as anyone, experts say.

“Much of the incoming material comes from the U.K., but a lot comes from the U.S.,” Jim Puckett, an activist with the non-profit watchdog group Basel Action Network and former toxics director for Greenpeace International, told FoxNews.com by email.

“Last time I was in (nearby) Accra there was a lot of used electronic equipment from the U.S. government arriving there.… When after some time the computers do not sell in the shops, young boys with carts come by and pick them up and take them to the Agbogbloshie wetland/slum area to burn.”

The Basel Convention, organized by the U.N. and adopted in 1989 in Basel, Switzerland, aims to prevent the trade and movement of hazardous electronic wastes. To date, 180 countries and the European Union have signed on to the treaty.

The U.S. signed the treaty in 1990, but Congress never ratified it.

According to State Department policy, shipping electronics for repair, refurbishment or remanufacturing “does not constitute movement of waste, and thus is not impacted by the Convention or its procedures.” In addition, it says, the Convention lacks authority to enforce its own policy.

A number of U.S. businesses have sprung up that export e-waste to other countries -- the repair and remanufacturing the State Department mentions. Good Point Recycling, for example, processes 13 million pounds of electronics annually. Robin Ingenthron, the founder of the company, told FoxNews.com the Basel Convention and overeager activists have led to short-sighted policy. California recently shredded $100 million worth of reusable gear, rather than export it as “e-waste,” he said.

“As someone who lived in Africa for two and a half years,” Ingenthron said, “if you just go to World Bank statistics, Lagos (in Nigeria) had 6.9 million households with televisions in 2007. So what do you expect to see in Lagos dumps?”

And the photos from Agbogbloshie?

“The photos show stuff that’s been there for 15 years,” he said.

Quantifying the problem
Rather than the Basel Convention, the U.S. relies upon the electronics industry to police itself, through guidelines such as the National Strategy for Electronics Stewardship, a 2011 policy document from the EPA. (The EPA did not respond to FoxNews.com questions in time for this article.) It offers recommendations, not regulations.

As a result, activists say, the U.S. is essentially blind to the problem. We have no way to quantify the e-waste we export.

“When a nation ratifies the Basel Convention, they are required to monitor their export of hazardous waste,” said Sarah Westervelt, stewardship policy director with Basel Action Network. “We are not monitoring our export of this particular hazardous waste. We literally are not quantifying it.

“If we were to ratify the convention, we would be required to measure so we could quantify.”

The U.S. recently set out to do that. In December, the National Center for Electronics Recycling, working with researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and funded by the EPA, released a report titled “Quantitative Characterization of Domestic and Transboundary Flows of Used Electronics,” which sought to measure the flow of waste from the U.S.

“We really don’t have a good handle on what exactly … is getting exported every year,” Jason Linnell, executive director of NCER and the report’s author, told FoxNews.com. “We needed to find a good way to get more data about what is actually going out of the country and set up a way to measure things going forward.”

The report found that 66 percent of e-waste in the U.S. is collected, but just 8.5 percent of it is exported as whole products. This represents the low end of what’s being exported, Linnell acknowledged, since the analysis relied on self-reports from the industry. Still, he thinks there has been progress.

Over the last 15 years, he said, “I tend to think the industry has come a long way. Blatant exporting … that’s harder to do now than it ever was.”

But Westervelt blasted the report and its methodology, saying it’s pointless to rely on the industry to report its own exports.

“Unfortunately the report is incredibly flawed,” she said. “When they have this voluntary survey that asks, ‘are you exporting to Africa,’ you’re not going to be getting reliable response.”

No end in sight
Meanwhile the volume of e-waste remains incredibly high. According to EPA estimates, 1.79 million tons were trashed in 2010 -- not including “TV peripherals” like VCRs, DVD players and so on.

And that number has likely soared, thanks to the explosion in mobile phones. But because the U.S. is the only developed country that hasn’t ratified the Basel Convention, it is in a unique position: It’s perfectly legal to load up a container ship with hazardous junk and sell it to the highest bidder. Once the container ship enters international water, though, it falls under the umbrella of international law -- where it’s illegal for about 143 developing countries to accept it. Many do anyway: e-waste is a lucrative business, after all.

“Companies are making money off this on both ends. But they’re causing these irreparable long-term impacts,” Westervelt said.

Ingenthron pointed out that Basel Action Network is one of those companies making money -- its e-Stewards program certifies recyclers and exporters, and charges them a hefty fee to be listed in its database, he alleged.

“They’re charging hundreds of thousands to certify companies for export,” he said. “None of that money goes to Africa.

“And that’s our objection to these photos. Its poverty porn.”

Jeremy A. Kaplan is Science and Technology editor at FoxNews.com, where he heads up coverage of gadgets, the online world, space travel, nature, the environment, and more. Prior to joining Fox, he was executive editor of PC Magazine, co-host of the Fastest Geek competition, and a founding editor of GoodCleanTech.

Copyright

© Jeremy KaplanHow Green - FoxNews.com

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Contest winners propose nuclear applications for old CRTs

Contest winners propose nuclear applications for old CRTs

By. Dr. Thomas Engelhardt

Last month CEA and the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries Inc. (ISRI) ® announced the winner of the “CRT Challenge.” The goal was to identify financially viable, environmentally conscious proposals for using recycled CRT glass. This CRT challenge was a crowd-sourced technical competition to find new uses for old CRT glass, a powerful way to dispose of old TVs and monitors. 

Dr. Thomas Engelhardt was the winner of the CRT Challenge. Here is an explanation of his winning proposal. 

The disruptive impact of modern flat screen displays on the established recycling system of cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is an interesting example of how technology changes affect manufacturing and the environment.

Since making new CRTs is no longer an option, other uses for this material have to be found. CRT glass contains up to 30 percent lead and could be seen as very rich lead ore, which sounds good, but the glass portion gets in the way. A brilliant way of getting lead out of the CRT glass is being commercialized but requires investing in a dedicated plant. Without new uses, the outlets for recycled lead containing glass are limited and do not allow for processing all the CRT material.

The solution is simple—why not use lead-containing glass in the vitrification process? Vitrification of nuclear waste is a mature technology that has been used for more than 40 years in France, Germany, Belgium, Russia, Japan and the United States. It involves the melting of waste material with glass-forming additives so that the final glassy product immobilizes the waste material, trapping the lead and the other elements in the glass. The Environmental Protection Agency has declared vitrification to be the “best demonstrated available technology” for heavy metals and high-level radioactive waste.

The Hanford vitrification plant in Washington State is projected to produce approximately 160,000 cubic meters of glass material which, at five percent dosage of CRT glass, would consume around 24,000 tons of CRT material. The Hanford Waste Treatment Plant represents a long-term outlet for CRT glass, since operations are planned to run until 2028.

This potential outlet for the CRT waste stream uses established technology and covers the time span relevant for recycling CRT material. The main hurdle will be to qualify the CRT material as a new component in the vitrification process.

Final storage of the vitrified material is done under extremely controlled conditions, which reduces the risk of lead emissions. Safety and environmental aspects of nuclear waste processing and storage may trigger lengthy tests and prevent a fast implementation. Working with an organization such as the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is crucial to identifying the best solution and speeding up the development and testing phase for CRT glass containing vitrification material.

Copyright

© DR. THOMAS ENGELHARDT

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Trash or Treasure?

Trash or Treasure?

As Rep. Gene Green prepares to reintroduce the Responsible Electronics Recycling Act, a recent study says such legislation would generate numerous jobs in the U.S. However, the proposed legislation still has detractors.

Curt Harler – Recycling Today

APRIL 1, 2013

Electronics are part of our everyday waste stream. Many government officials say they feel the improper disposal of such devices presents a risk to both American jobs and to the world’s environment.

To that end, a bill known as the Responsible Electronics Recycling Act (RERA) was introduced in Congress as HR 2284 in June 2011 by Texas Rep. Gene Green, a Democrat, with 14 Republicans and nine Democrats signing on as co-sponsors. However, it died in committee. According to his office, Green will reintroduce the measure in this session of Congress. The bill restricts exports of untested and nonworking electronics from the U.S. to developing countries, though it would still allow free trade of tested and working used electronics being exported for reuse.

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Finding Top-Tier Electronics Recyclers - The R2 Standard

Finding Top-Tier Electronics Recyclers - The R2 Standard

Until recently, municipalities, businesses and residents seeking recycling services for used electronic equipment had very few assurances that electronic scrap would be handled correctly by their chosen recycler. Aside from a recycler’s promise, how would consumers of electronics recycling services know claims of environmental and social responsibility were authentic? Large corporations would sometimes take on the expense of auditing a recycler, and possibly even the recycler’s downstream vendors. However, this is a time consuming and expensive process that too few customers had the resources to perform. A certification program specifically designed for the electronics recycling industry was clearly needed. There was rising industry support to develop a standard that would effectively address the operational and materials management concerns associated with electronics recycling activities, and give customers confidence that their electronic equipment was being responsibly recycled.

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Data Security in an Information-Rich Age

Data Security in an Information-Rich Age

In today’s society, important personal information like credit card accounts, social security numbers, and private data has become easily exploitable by those who fail to recognize the importance of data security. When taking an old storage device to your local neighborhood electronics recycler, you should ask certain questions to ensure that your information will be destroyed securely and responsibly.

Ask questions like: What happens to my IT Scrap? What does your company do to protect my data? Are you authorized to accept data sensitive electronics for recycling? Is you company R2 certified? The R2 certification is awarded to those electronics recyclers that follow the voluntary Responsible Recycling standard developed by the EPA. Not only does this standard focus on the importance of accountable e-waste recycling, but it ensures customers that their data is being destroyed securely though the scrutiny placed on the recycler’s data destruction processes.

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Locally Owned and Operated

Locally Owned and Operated

For four years, Accurate IT Services has been servicing the Central Ohio region with all their electronics recycling, asset recovery, and data destruction needs. And why not? We are a Columbus company minority owned and veteran operated who employs Columbus residents. As our business grows alongside a booming e-waste market, we would like to continue to serve our dedicated customers throughout Columbus and the region with free pickups, payment for electronic equipment, and guaranteed asset recovery and data destruction.

In addition, we have the capacity to reach across Ohio, servicing companies from Cleveland and Toledo to Cincinnati and Athens and everywhere in between. We regularly hold e-waste recycling drives throughout Ohio, servicing and putting money back into communities that have no other outlet for electronics. Furthermore, we now offer a zero-landfill box program for residential and business customers nationwide. Check out our “Services” page for more information.

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Division of Recycling & Litter Prevention Recognizes Accurate IT Recycling Services in Marion

Division of Recycling & Litter Prevention Recognizes Accurate IT Recycling Services in Marion

Marion County Recycles Electronic Waste

-Over 19,000 lbs collected


Marion collaborated with local businesses to collect more than 19,480 pounds of electronic waste at its event on June 11. The Marion County Recycling & Litter Prevention Office partnered with Buffalo Wild Wings, Perkins Family Restaurant, Accurate IT, City of Marion, Marion County Commissioners, Marion County Council on Aging, and Servex Electronics to assist in this collection event.201120Marion20Recycling20Sign

"This is the first ever TV collection in the county. More and more recycling centers and landfills are refusing to take televisions because they are a hazard and expensive to safely process." - Angela Carbetta, Recycling Coordinator for Marion County Recycling & Litter Prevention


This electronics drop off event was open to businesses and schools instead of just residents. Accurate IT Recycling Services of Columbus collected all types of electronics for free, except for televisions. Because of the costs of processing, there was a $15 recycling fee for TVs.

Participants received food coupons from Buffalo Wild Wings and Perkins and a chance to enter a drawing for a flat-screen television from Servex Electronics.

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Federal Legislation on E-Waste Recycling

Federal Legislation on E-Waste Recycling

Recently, the Responsible Electronics Recycling Act of 2011 was introduced with bi-partisan support in both the U.S. House and Senate. In short, the bill would make it illegal to send toxic e-waste to developing nations. Toxic e-waste includes, among others, waste Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs), waste batteries, and items containing mercury. These materials are essentially the “Focus Materials” defined in the Responsible Recycling (R2) standard developed by the EPA.

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Recycling with us pays!

Recycling with us pays!

The slogan plastered across our website, truck, and business cards is a testament to our unique practice within our field. While most electronics recycling companies charge for their services, we offer ours free of charge to businesses, schools, and other organizations. In addition, the public is free to drop off all electronics, excluding CRT monitors and televisions, for no charge. More importantly, we are sometimes even able to pay the customer for remarket able equipment! Here at Accurate IT Services we attempt to find the value in all of our customers’ e-waste goods to maximize their asset return.

So how does this work, you ask? At Accurate IT Services, we will do an on-site value assessment of electronic equipment to determine its “remarketability.” We base our assessment on the age, condition, and specifications of the product. For instance, if a product is within four years of age, in good condition, and has remarketable specifications, there will most certainly be a payout. We base our payout scale on the remarket value of the product and provide the customer with a percentage of that, much like secondhand clothing stores or consignment shops.

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Retail Sales

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For over ten years Accurate IT Services has been at the forefront of Internet retail with our value priced LCD monitors, laptops, computers, and professional grade CRT monitors.

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Recycling Services

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Accurate IT Services offers free drop off your old non mercury technology. Accurate IT pays you for most remarketable technology.

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