E-Waste News

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New reports find the average lifespan of a flat panel TV to be 10 years

tvsA U.K. based non-profit group called WRAP conducted a study on 400 flat panel TVs that measured their life span. They also measured average laptop life spans in this study. Flat panel TVs lasted an average of 10 years, while laptops came in at a close second at 9.6 years. This information is crucial to calculate, as recyclers must be able to prepare for the estimated 470 million flat panel TVs to enter the E-waste stream. Some of these TVs are being closely monitored by this group because they contain mercury from cold cathode fluorescent lamps. According to WRAP the industry could potentially face challenges with this type of material.

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Download Our Free AIT Electronics Recycling App!

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We have released our first app on Google Play and it is available for android devices. It will be available for Apple devices in the coming weeks. With our app, you can easily schedule a pickup for your business by sending us a pickup request along with the information associated with it, including equipment types and amounts. The app sends us an email request where we will get in touch with you to schedule your date of pickup based on the information you provide. Our app also features a recycling calculator where you can see your environmental impact. This calculator estimates the weight of equipment diverted from the landfill. It also shows the toxic chemicals you have diverted from the landfills by recycling your electronics. Download our new app today and make scheduling your pickup of E-waste easier than ever! You can download our app here: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.recycling.ait.aitelectronicsrecycling

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Woman Recycles Apple Computer Worth 200K in California

Woman Recycles Apple Computer Worth 200K in California

A rare Apple computer from 1976 was recycled in California by a woman cleaning out her garage. Little did she know, that computer was one of only two hundred that were made by Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and Ron Wayne. Now the company is on the hunt to find this woman, who did not leave any information when she dropped off the computer, and he remembers her well. According to the company, all she needs to do is stop by the warehouse to claim 100K, her half of the proceeds.

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The Aztechs Robotics Team Visits Accurate IT Services

The Aztechs Robotics Team Visits Accurate IT Services

Accurate IT Services and Director of Client Relations Jack Knapp were pleased to have The Aztechs Robotics Team visit our facility this week. They are part of Dublin City Schools and are working on a recycling project. These young students are learning how to reuse electronics and computer parts. Anand Padmanabhan, the coach for the team, toured the facility along with these students and learned about our process. We are happy to see students learning about recycling and caring about the environment. Thank you, Aztechs for touring our facility and allowing us to teach you about electronics recycling.

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Hands-On Recycling Learning Environment For K-12 Announced

A pilot project has been started for thousands of students in the New York, Maryland, and Michigan areas. This new project will include a hands on learning environment surrounding the science of recycling. The project is headed by the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) and they plan to combine both classroom learning along with on-site visits to local recycling centers. JASON learning, a non profit group, also helped in the development of this program. ISRI believes that this project will teach these students the skills needed for careers in the field and help them develop interests in science, technology, engineering, etc. The president of ISRI believes that this education process will create the next generation of leaders for the recycling industry.

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Accurate IT Services at SWACO Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

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Accurate IT was excited to be invited by SWACO to attend the ribbon cutting ceremony for their new Landfill Gas-to-Energy Facility.  Jack Knapp, our Director of Client Relations was among the many guest who attended.  There were also representatives from the EPA, US Senate, House of Representatives, and many local communities.  The event included several speakers, a facility tour, a ribbon cutting ceremony, and cake. The event was a huge success and we are thankful for SWACO inviting us to be part of it.

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More than 200K plastic bottles dumped in UCF Reflecting Pond

The University of Central Florida had over 200,000 plastic bottles dumped into their reflecting pond to raise awareness about our impact on the environment. This event was called Reflect on Sustainability and was created by the IDEAS for UCF and the UCF Student Government. Many students were shocked and some thought it was a prank. As you can see in the video, these students are taking a bolder approach to raise awareness and it seems to be working. Of course, after the demonstration, the bottles will be removed and recycled. To view the full video and article, click the link below.

 

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/features/jon-busdeker/os-plastic-bottles-ucf-pond-post.html

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Announcing A Fully Compostable Single-Serve Coffee Pod That Works With Keurig Machines

Announcing A Fully Compostable Single-Serve Coffee Pod That Works With Keurig Machines

Canadian roaster Club Coffee has come up with the first fully compostable single-serve coffee pod that works with the Keurig machines. They are one of the companies that sued Keurig for controlling the market and creating a monopoly to keep prices for the cups very high. Their product is the PurPod100, made from coffee chaff, which is the skin of the bean that comes off during the roasting process. It is compostable because it is designed to be digested by bacteria. This cup can be fully broken down with composting in a matter of weeks. They are working on multiple certifications including their final certification to bring this product to market. This will make it much easier to recycle these pods because currently for many of the pods that can be recycled, the coffee grounds and the lid have to be separated from the cup in order to recycle it. It’s easier to make the cup of coffee at this point than it is to dispose of the cup that brews it, leaving most of them ending up in the trash. With this company moving forward at a rapid pace, the fully compostable pods will be on grocery store shelves in no time.

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Marion County Recycling & Litter Prevention

Marion County Recycling & Litter Prevention

Announcing the 2015 Green Community Award Winners! Tri-Rivers Recycling Center, Marca Industries Document Destruruction & Recycling, ECO Center, Sims Brothers Recycling, Goodwill, DKMM Solid Waste District, MCI Green Initiative, Accurate IT Recycling Services, Keep Ohio Beautiful have all worked together to make Marion County cleaner and greener. Thanks for all you do! #BeeTheGood — at Marion County Building.

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The e-scrap year in review 2014

The e-scrap year in review 2014

Dec. 31, 2014

With the new year upon us, E-Scrap Newsrecaps a busy 2014 news cycle that saw CRT glass management issues take center stage alongside legislative battles and some surprising industry twists and turns.

In January, talk of a national billlimiting e-scrap exports was quelled after remarks made by Rep. John Shimkus. In a meeting with the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), Shimkus stated the proposed legislation, known as RERA, was not on his subcommittee's agenda for 2014. That development was celebrated by ISRI, a powerful opponent of the legislation, while the Coalition for American Electronics Recycling pledged to fight on.

On the heels of an announcement by Sims Recycling Solutions that 12 of its 14 North American facilities had become dual-certified to the e-Stewards and R2 standards, E-Scrap Newstook a look at the growing dual-certification trend. Research found more than 70 percent of firms certified to e-Stewards also held the R2 certification. John Shegerian, the CEO of Electronic Recyclers International, told the magazine dual certification was a simple matter of client demand. "So many clients wanted R2 and so many clients wanted e-Stewards, so we said we're just going to do both."

Based on the findings of an extensive telephone survey, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) released data on remaining U.S. CRT tonnages. While about half as high as a previous estimate by recycling firm Kuusakoski, the CEA figure suggested roughly 3.5 million tons of CRT TVs and computer monitors could be found in American closets, basements and living rooms. "There are still a lot of CRTs out there. ... Six billion pounds of CRT TVs and 1 billion pounds of CRT monitors," Walter Alcorn, CEA's vice president of environmental affairs, said at the time. "But it's not infinite. This too shall pass, in terms of the CRT stream."

A former e-Stewards and R2-certified firm found itself in hot water this past March after leaving behind a significant stockpile of CRT glass at its closed Cincinnati site. After closing in 2013, 2trg sold its assets to publicly traded E-Waste Systems (EWSI) and claimed EWSI was also responsible for the glass on site. EWSI denied those claims but eventually participated in an effort to clean up the site. EWSI, the subject of a feature in the June 2014 print edition of E-Scrap News, would later be evicted from its own Ohio location in late 2014.

Creative Recycling Systems announced in May it would be closing its central processing facility in Tampa, Florida. The announcement was followed by rapid closuresof Creative properties throughout the country as the firm battled an $18.7 million lawsuit against it by Regions Bank. Creative filed for bankruptcy and looked for a potential buyer, but on Dec. 16 of 2014 announced it would aim to liquify its remaining assets.

After closing facilities in Dallas and New Jersey, Sims Recycling Solutions (SRS) formulated a major restructuring of its Canadian and U.K. operations. The company said it was closing all Canadian operations and substantially reducing its U.K. activity. While competition was cited as a major challenge in the U.K., Sims argued original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in Canada had formed a "virtual monopoly organization" that forced the firm out of the region.

In a victory for reuse advocates in the industry, Congress passed a phone unlocking bill in late July to overturn a 2012 decision by the Librarian of Congress that essentially made unlockings illegal. By making both individual and bulk unlockings legal again, Congress opened the door for the industry to bypass wireless carriers and free devices to be resold and reused worldwide. The victory, however, has the potential to be short-lived, as the Librarian of Congress has the power in 2015 to again review the reach of the Digital Millenium Copyright Act and determine whether unlockings should be legal or illegal.

Though much of 2014 was defined by CRT management struggles, a note of hope was sounded in late summer. Reporting on the state electronics recycling program in Washington showed e-scrap tonnages collected in the Evergreen State were on the decline year-over-year, an indication thatfewer CRT devices were being handed in by residents. Some industry observers said the numbers may be a sign that U.S. CRT volumes could be close to plateauing.

The developing world's informal processing sector was a focal point of analysis and discussion at the Electronics Recycling Asia Conference, held in Singapore in Asia. Speakers from government groups, recycling firms and nonprofit organizations all touched on strategies to help transform processing conditions in poorer areas but noted existing structures should be developed, not eradicated altogether.

 

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

http://resource-recycling.com/node/5547

Copyright

© 2015

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Contest winners propose nuclear applications for old CRTs

Contest winners propose nuclear applications for old CRTs

By. Dr. Thomas Engelhardt

Last month CEA and the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries Inc. (ISRI) ® announced the winner of the “CRT Challenge.” The goal was to identify financially viable, environmentally conscious proposals for using recycled CRT glass. This CRT challenge was a crowd-sourced technical competition to find new uses for old CRT glass, a powerful way to dispose of old TVs and monitors. 

Dr. Thomas Engelhardt was the winner of the CRT Challenge. Here is an explanation of his winning proposal. 

The disruptive impact of modern flat screen displays on the established recycling system of cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is an interesting example of how technology changes affect manufacturing and the environment.

Since making new CRTs is no longer an option, other uses for this material have to be found. CRT glass contains up to 30 percent lead and could be seen as very rich lead ore, which sounds good, but the glass portion gets in the way. A brilliant way of getting lead out of the CRT glass is being commercialized but requires investing in a dedicated plant. Without new uses, the outlets for recycled lead containing glass are limited and do not allow for processing all the CRT material.

The solution is simple—why not use lead-containing glass in the vitrification process? Vitrification of nuclear waste is a mature technology that has been used for more than 40 years in France, Germany, Belgium, Russia, Japan and the United States. It involves the melting of waste material with glass-forming additives so that the final glassy product immobilizes the waste material, trapping the lead and the other elements in the glass. The Environmental Protection Agency has declared vitrification to be the “best demonstrated available technology” for heavy metals and high-level radioactive waste.

The Hanford vitrification plant in Washington State is projected to produce approximately 160,000 cubic meters of glass material which, at five percent dosage of CRT glass, would consume around 24,000 tons of CRT material. The Hanford Waste Treatment Plant represents a long-term outlet for CRT glass, since operations are planned to run until 2028.

This potential outlet for the CRT waste stream uses established technology and covers the time span relevant for recycling CRT material. The main hurdle will be to qualify the CRT material as a new component in the vitrification process.

Final storage of the vitrified material is done under extremely controlled conditions, which reduces the risk of lead emissions. Safety and environmental aspects of nuclear waste processing and storage may trigger lengthy tests and prevent a fast implementation. Working with an organization such as the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is crucial to identifying the best solution and speeding up the development and testing phase for CRT glass containing vitrification material.

Copyright

© DR. THOMAS ENGELHARDT

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For over ten years Accurate IT Services has been at the forefront of Internet retail with our value priced LCD monitors, laptops, computers, and professional grade CRT monitors.

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