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CRT glass processor hit with $120,000 fine

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

March 20, 2014

An Arizona plant operated by Pennsylvania-based Dlubak Glass has been hit with a $120,000 fine for improper storage and recycling of CRTs.

During a routine inspection of the company's Yuma, Arizona plant, Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) officials discovered broken CRT glass "throughout the five-acre facility," an ADEQ press release states. Soil stains were also detected, with lead levels "as much as 75 times more than the maximum federal and state exceedance level of five milligrams per liter."

In court, the company agreed to pay the $120,000 fine and store all glass indoors in clearly marked containers. Soil cleanup has also been performed.

Yuma is also the site of a now-notorious CRT abandonment by Dow Management in 2013. Approximately 3,000 tons of glass were left behind by Dow and a "voluntary" cleanup process has been undertaken by the company's former suppliers, ADEQ told E-Scrap News.

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by ClickGreen staff. Published Wed 26 Feb 2014

Despite the popularity of the mobile phone recycling industry, handsets only contribute towards a small percentage of the overall E-Waste accumulation. 

According to a study by the US US environmental Protection Agency only 11% of electronic waste is made up of mobile devices, the remaining 89% is computers, accessories, televisions and TV peripherals. 

UK based recyclers Bozowi Sell My Camera stated "Because mobile phone recycling has become such a large business venture over the last decade, people forget that handsets are a relatively small part of e-waste and you should consider recycling all your electrical devices the way you would with your phone."

43% of e-waste accretion is digital accessories and in 2010 this accumulated to a staggering 1,015,000 tons, 9% of which are digital cameras. 

This increasing trend of disposing of cameras is considered to be a by-product of consumers choosing Smartphones over digital cameras. The Telegraph reported that from 2006 to 2011 camera sales dropped by £245 million, which corresponds well the massive increases in smartphone popularity over the last eight years. 

Mintel Technology Analyst Samuel Gee said: "Although smartphone cameras do not typically match the quality of output of dedicated devices, the technology is consistently improving, as the quality of camera image output becomes too high for consumers to reliably distinguish between competitors."

The same report also stated that 21% of camera and camcorder owners agree that smartphones are a better long term investment. 

The managing director of Bozowi responded "We understand better than anyone that mobile phone recycling is the more finically secure route, but us and other recyclers need to start broadening our focus if we genuinely care about the deterioration of e-waste accumulation". 

Bozowi stated that they are developing a more diverse database and campaign that should hopefully encourage people to recycle more electrical appliances than just mobile phones. This campaign will also treat digital camera recycling as one of its primary focus points. 

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By 

Published March 06, 2014

FoxNews.com

 

It used to be wetlands, a recreation zone. Today the locals call it Sodom and Gomorrah.

Slag heaps of rusting electronics, old refrigerators and monitors are scattered everywhere in Agbogbloshie, a dumping ground in Ghana for electronic waste from the rest of the world. On the banks of a polluted river, smoking heaps of burning junk spew bilious, black fumes into the sky. To breathe is to cede years of your life.

The residents of Agbogbloshie are well aware of the poisons in the used electronics they scavenge. But for them, scavenging is the only way to make a buck.

“What you do to get money is what kills you,” one resident said recently. A translator went on to explain, “He knows that, yeah, I’m going to die from this someday. What can I do?”

Another explained the problem in broken English: “We are crying for work, suffering for work. How to eat is hard. There is no job enough, that’s why we come to south. And there is no job to the south. Only this.”

Kevin McElvaney, a 26-year-old business administrator from Germany, recently went to Agbogbloshie to document its ecotech disaster. His portraits show the people working there, mainly kids between 7 and 25, struggling to make a living.

“Before you enter the burning fields of Agbogbloshie, you will recognize a huge market. On one side you can buy cheap local fruits and vegetables and on the other side you will see loads of manufacturers and scrap dealers. Go to these scrap dealers and you will see men sitting on broken TVs smashing their hammers and simple tools against any kind of car parts, machines and electronic devices,” he wrote recently on his blog.

Whose trash is it, anyway?
Over the course of four days, McElvaney met hundreds of young boys and girls, most from the northern part of the country, who came south to burn cables and extract the copper from them. It can be sold on the market for pennies. Monitors can be disassembled to extract bits of precious metals; electronic parts can be removed from gadgets and sold – but at a terrible cost to the human body.

“Injuries like sears, untreated wounds, lung problems, eye and back damages go side by side with chronic nausea, anorexia, heavy headaches,” he wrote.

And where does the trash come from? Despite efforts to police itself, the U.S. contributes as much to the problem as anyone, experts say.

“Much of the incoming material comes from the U.K., but a lot comes from the U.S.,” Jim Puckett, an activist with the non-profit watchdog group Basel Action Network and former toxics director for Greenpeace International, told FoxNews.com by email.

“Last time I was in (nearby) Accra there was a lot of used electronic equipment from the U.S. government arriving there.… When after some time the computers do not sell in the shops, young boys with carts come by and pick them up and take them to the Agbogbloshie wetland/slum area to burn.”

The Basel Convention, organized by the U.N. and adopted in 1989 in Basel, Switzerland, aims to prevent the trade and movement of hazardous electronic wastes. To date, 180 countries and the European Union have signed on to the treaty.

The U.S. signed the treaty in 1990, but Congress never ratified it.

According to State Department policy, shipping electronics for repair, refurbishment or remanufacturing “does not constitute movement of waste, and thus is not impacted by the Convention or its procedures.” In addition, it says, the Convention lacks authority to enforce its own policy.

A number of U.S. businesses have sprung up that export e-waste to other countries -- the repair and remanufacturing the State Department mentions. Good Point Recycling, for example, processes 13 million pounds of electronics annually. Robin Ingenthron, the founder of the company, told FoxNews.com the Basel Convention and overeager activists have led to short-sighted policy. California recently shredded $100 million worth of reusable gear, rather than export it as “e-waste,” he said.

“As someone who lived in Africa for two and a half years,” Ingenthron said, “if you just go to World Bank statistics, Lagos (in Nigeria) had 6.9 million households with televisions in 2007. So what do you expect to see in Lagos dumps?”

And the photos from Agbogbloshie?

“The photos show stuff that’s been there for 15 years,” he said.

Quantifying the problem
Rather than the Basel Convention, the U.S. relies upon the electronics industry to police itself, through guidelines such as the National Strategy for Electronics Stewardship, a 2011 policy document from the EPA. (The EPA did not respond to FoxNews.com questions in time for this article.) It offers recommendations, not regulations.

As a result, activists say, the U.S. is essentially blind to the problem. We have no way to quantify the e-waste we export.

“When a nation ratifies the Basel Convention, they are required to monitor their export of hazardous waste,” said Sarah Westervelt, stewardship policy director with Basel Action Network. “We are not monitoring our export of this particular hazardous waste. We literally are not quantifying it.

“If we were to ratify the convention, we would be required to measure so we could quantify.”

The U.S. recently set out to do that. In December, the National Center for Electronics Recycling, working with researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and funded by the EPA, released a report titled “Quantitative Characterization of Domestic and Transboundary Flows of Used Electronics,” which sought to measure the flow of waste from the U.S.

“We really don’t have a good handle on what exactly … is getting exported every year,” Jason Linnell, executive director of NCER and the report’s author, told FoxNews.com. “We needed to find a good way to get more data about what is actually going out of the country and set up a way to measure things going forward.”

The report found that 66 percent of e-waste in the U.S. is collected, but just 8.5 percent of it is exported as whole products. This represents the low end of what’s being exported, Linnell acknowledged, since the analysis relied on self-reports from the industry. Still, he thinks there has been progress.

Over the last 15 years, he said, “I tend to think the industry has come a long way. Blatant exporting … that’s harder to do now than it ever was.”

But Westervelt blasted the report and its methodology, saying it’s pointless to rely on the industry to report its own exports.

“Unfortunately the report is incredibly flawed,” she said. “When they have this voluntary survey that asks, ‘are you exporting to Africa,’ you’re not going to be getting reliable response.”

No end in sight
Meanwhile the volume of e-waste remains incredibly high. According to EPA estimates, 1.79 million tons were trashed in 2010 -- not including “TV peripherals” like VCRs, DVD players and so on.

And that number has likely soared, thanks to the explosion in mobile phones. But because the U.S. is the only developed country that hasn’t ratified the Basel Convention, it is in a unique position: It’s perfectly legal to load up a container ship with hazardous junk and sell it to the highest bidder. Once the container ship enters international water, though, it falls under the umbrella of international law -- where it’s illegal for about 143 developing countries to accept it. Many do anyway: e-waste is a lucrative business, after all.

“Companies are making money off this on both ends. But they’re causing these irreparable long-term impacts,” Westervelt said.

Ingenthron pointed out that Basel Action Network is one of those companies making money -- its e-Stewards program certifies recyclers and exporters, and charges them a hefty fee to be listed in its database, he alleged.

“They’re charging hundreds of thousands to certify companies for export,” he said. “None of that money goes to Africa.

“And that’s our objection to these photos. Its poverty porn.”

Jeremy A. Kaplan is Science and Technology editor at FoxNews.com, where he heads up coverage of gadgets, the online world, space travel, nature, the environment, and more. Prior to joining Fox, he was executive editor of PC Magazine, co-host of the Fastest Geek competition, and a founding editor of GoodCleanTech.

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Closed Cincinnati firm leaves behind major CRT stockpile

By Bobby Elliott and Dan Leif, E-Scrap News

March 7, 2014

E-scrap processor 2TRG has left behind significant tonnages of CRT glass as its former Cincinnati facility, several sources, including the Ohio EPA, have informed E-Scrap News.

After closing the doors to its 11093 Kenwood Road facility in Cincinnati last year, 2TRG, a former R2- and e-Stewards-certified processor, abandoned "tons upon tons of [CRT] glass" in Gaylord boxes, Global Environmental Services (GES) president Kenny Gravitt told E-Scrap News. Apparently unable to pay for downstream processing, 2TRG left at least 1,500 tons of the glass at the facility, Gravitt said.

Another processor who also toured the facility estimated there were upwards of 3,000 tons of intact and crushed CRT glass on-site.

While declining to confirm either estimate, the Ohio EPA did verify the existence of the glass at the former 2TRG facility. "Ohio EPA staff has visited the site," Dina Pierce, the state agency's media coordinator, told E-Scrap News. "Staff saw a large number of Gaylord boxes onsite containing various computer parts (not just CRT glass)."

State rules, according to Pierce and the Ohio EPA, hold both "the owner and operator responsible for appropriate management of CRT glass." With 2TRG no longer in business, the "property owner's representative told our inspectors he intends to take bids for a contract to remove the stockpiled computer materials, including the CRT glass," Pierce said.

Three processors, including GES, told E-Scrap News they had each entered a bid to take over the glass. One processor estimated a cleanup cost of roughly $600,000, while another suggested costs could easily exceed $1 million.

Attempts to contact the property owner and property manager were unsuccessful. Repeated attempts to reach former 2TRG executives, including CFO and founder Carol Weinstein, were unsuccessful.

Pierce told E-Scrap News the Ohio EPA "will monitor and follow up as needed to make sure any hazardous wastes at the site are properly managed and removed."

A number of 2TRG's assets were acquired in December of 2013 by the publicly traded firm E-Waste Systems (EWSI). An EWSI executive told E-Scrap News the acquisition excluded "anything that would have been a liability" and sources indicated 2TRG's CRT glass did not change hands in the deal.

While an increasing number of processors have indicated challenges moving CRTs downstream, 2TRG's alleged misconduct could represent one of the most surprising instances of a trusted and lauded firm unable to figure out how to address CRT management costs. The company had facilities in Geneva, New York and Georgetown, Kentucky in addition to the Cincinnati location.

As reported in this publication, a handful of other e-scrap processors, including some in Arizona, Colorado and Maryland, have also left piles of CRTs in warehouses. However, in comparison with 2TRG, some of those firms were small, underfunded operations. 2TRG was a more sizable industry member. For instance, the firm was previously a member of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries Inc., and the Cincinnati plant was certified under the industry's two hallmark standards, e-Stewards and R2.

Executives at 2TRG have previously stated the firm had annual revenues of more than $5 million annually and its three plants had a total footprint of more than 200,000 square feet.

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Global e-scrap market to quadruple in coming years

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Feb. 28, 2014

The annual e-scrap market is expected to reach nearly $41.4 billion by 2019, more than four times its 2012 value of $9.8 billion.

According to a market report by Transparency Market Research, regulatory improvements, sustainability programs from major manufacturers and "rapid industrialization" will play a major role in driving market growth. While Europe "dominated" e-scrap recycling in 2012, emerging economies in the Asia-Pacific, benefiting from cheap labor and rising access to used electronics, are expected to represent the fastest growing market for e-scrap going forward.

The region, which includes Korea, Taiwan, India, China and Japan, is also noted for its lack of regulatory measures, making it one of the biggest landing spots for e-scrap collected elsewhere.

By volume, the global e-scrap market reached 48.43 million tons of material in 2012. Volumes in 2019 are expected to reach about 141.1 tons, nearly tripling 2012 totals.

By revenue, steel accounted for a little more than a third of global e-scrap revenues. Steel, owing to its value as a recycled commodity, was also the most recycled material in the e-scrap stream during 2012.

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R2 certification hits milestone

By Editorial Staff, E-Scrap News

Feb. 14, 2014

More than 500 e-scrap recycling facilities around the world are now certified to the R2 standard.

R2 Solutions, the nonprofit organization responsible for developing and administering the standard, announced the news Feb. 7 in a press release. A total of 508 facilities across 14 countries are currently certified and "more are in the pipeline," the release states.

Facilities will have to update their certification this year to meet the recently introduced R2:2013 standard. A 58-page guidance document was released in November to aid firms conform to the changes, which include a requirement for certified facilities to have an environmental health and safety management system in place.

The R2 standard was founded in 2008.

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MIT/NCER release study on electronics recycling

Trade groups respond to the study, which says 90 percent of electronics collected in the U.S. are recycled domestically.

DECEMBER 20, 2013
 
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Materials Systems Laboratory and the U.S. National Center for Electronics Recycling (NCER) have released Quantitative Characterization of Domestic and Transboundary Flows of Used Electronics, a study that analyses the generation, collection and export of obsolete electronics generated in the United States. 


The study was completed under the umbrella of the StEP initiative—a partnership of several UN organizations, industry, government and international organizations, NGOs and the science sector—and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in support of the U.S. government’s National Strategy for Electronics Stewardship. 

According to the report, it “presents the results of an effort to calculate quantities of used electronics (as whole units) generated and collected in the United States and exported from the United States.” The authors calculated generation and collection quantities using “a sales obsolescence method that included uncertainty,” while export quantities were calculated based on trade data. “The advantage of the trade data approach is that trade data for all types of electronic products is widely available (including extensive historical data), updated relatively frequently and provides insight into the destinations of products,” the authors note. 

Jane Nishida, acting assistant administrator of EPA’s Office of International and Tribal Affairs, says, “We are pleased that StEP, working with the MIT and the NCER, was able to deliver a report that provides a scientific-based approach to generating information on U.S. exports of used electronics.”

According to the study, about 258.2 million units of used electronic were generated in the United States in 2010, of which 171.4 million units were collected. Export flows were estimated at 14.4 million units, or 8.5 percent of the collected estimate on average, the study notes. By weight, 1.6 million tons of used electronics were generated domestically in 2010, with 0.9 million tons collected for recycling. Of the collected electronics, 26,500 tons were exported, which is 3.1 percent of the electronics collected by weight. 

The study adds, “While the total quantity of used electronics exports reported here is most likely an underestimate due to the likelihood that some shipments of whole units are not reported using the proper trade codes, the proportions of exports to world regions is likely accurate.” 

According to the study, mobile phones dominate generation, collection and export on a unit basis, while television sets and monitors dominate on a weight basis. 

The Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), Washington, D.C., says it has welcomed the new report. According to ISRI, “This study, along with similar reports by the U.S. International Trade Commission and the International Data Corp., provide irrefutable evidence that used electronics products are being reused and recycled in America, not ‘dumped’ into developing countries as proponents of export controls have argued for years.”

Robin Wiener, president of ISRI, says, “This latest study adds to the growing body of evidence that the U.S. electronics recycling industry is flourishing, recycling used electronics right here in America. Over the past 10 years this market has shown tremendous growth, and, today, American recyclers have the know-how, the technology and the capacity to handle the growing stream of used electronics products collected domestically.”

ISRI adds that the EPA estimates that only 25 percent of eligible used household electronics products are being collected for recycling. “Figuring out a way to pull that remaining 75 percent out of the basements and garages of homes throughout America, as well as preventing the material from being disposed of in landfills, provides the largest opportunity for increasing the recycling of used electronics in the U.S. and thus increasing jobs in the domestic electronics recycling industry,” Wiener says.

To address the opportunities recycling holds, ISRI recently launched Project Reboot, an effort to educate consumers on the importance of responsibly recycling used electronics and make them aware of opportunities for recycling within their communities. 

The steering committee for the Coalition for American Electronics Recycling (CAER), which says it represents “U.S. companies that believe electronics recycling should be performed securely and sustainably, for the benefit of the American economy,” sent Recycling Today a statement in response to the release of MIT/NCER study and ISRI’s comments that reads:


“The new MIT/NCER study provides valuable insights into the dramatic growth of electronic waste around the world. However on the issue of exports, the study does not provide a sound platform for policy makers. As the authors note: ‘gaps in available data mean that the export quantities represent a lower bound. This is due to a lack of explicit data on used whole unit trade flows, which necessitates several key assumptions in the methodology. Therefore, it is important that other approaches be used to estimate export flows and compared with the quantities calculated in this report. This would provide insight into the magnitude of the error derived from the data gaps.

“As the largest representative body of electronics recyclers in the country, CAER members support the Responsible Electronics Recycling Act (HR 2791) based on our real world experience in the marketplace. As the researchers acknowledge, transboundary flows of e-waste are highly complex and we would welcome an opportunity to collaborate as this issue continues to evolve. 

“While we disagree with ISRI on RERA, we support their efforts to increase consumer recycling here in the U.S. through Project Reboot. We strongly agree that increasing the current 25 percent recycling rate must be a top priority.”

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Contest winners propose nuclear applications for old CRTs

By. Dr. Thomas Engelhardt

Last month CEA and the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries Inc. (ISRI) ® announced the winner of the “CRT Challenge.” The goal was to identify financially viable, environmentally conscious proposals for using recycled CRT glass. This CRT challenge was a crowd-sourced technical competition to find new uses for old CRT glass, a powerful way to dispose of old TVs and monitors. 

Dr. Thomas Engelhardt was the winner of the CRT Challenge. Here is an explanation of his winning proposal. 

The disruptive impact of modern flat screen displays on the established recycling system of cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is an interesting example of how technology changes affect manufacturing and the environment.

Since making new CRTs is no longer an option, other uses for this material have to be found. CRT glass contains up to 30 percent lead and could be seen as very rich lead ore, which sounds good, but the glass portion gets in the way. A brilliant way of getting lead out of the CRT glass is being commercialized but requires investing in a dedicated plant. Without new uses, the outlets for recycled lead containing glass are limited and do not allow for processing all the CRT material.

The solution is simple—why not use lead-containing glass in the vitrification process? Vitrification of nuclear waste is a mature technology that has been used for more than 40 years in France, Germany, Belgium, Russia, Japan and the United States. It involves the melting of waste material with glass-forming additives so that the final glassy product immobilizes the waste material, trapping the lead and the other elements in the glass. The Environmental Protection Agency has declared vitrification to be the “best demonstrated available technology” for heavy metals and high-level radioactive waste.

The Hanford vitrification plant in Washington State is projected to produce approximately 160,000 cubic meters of glass material which, at five percent dosage of CRT glass, would consume around 24,000 tons of CRT material. The Hanford Waste Treatment Plant represents a long-term outlet for CRT glass, since operations are planned to run until 2028.

This potential outlet for the CRT waste stream uses established technology and covers the time span relevant for recycling CRT material. The main hurdle will be to qualify the CRT material as a new component in the vitrification process.

Final storage of the vitrified material is done under extremely controlled conditions, which reduces the risk of lead emissions. Safety and environmental aspects of nuclear waste processing and storage may trigger lengthy tests and prevent a fast implementation. Working with an organization such as the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is crucial to identifying the best solution and speeding up the development and testing phase for CRT glass containing vitrification material.

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New Jersey presses residents to recycle e-scrap

By Bobby Elliott, E-Scrap News

Jan. 3, 2013

The administration of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is leading a charge to encourage residents to follow the state's e-scrap law and recycle used electronics.

Anticipating a surge of electronics replaced by newer devices this holiday season, the Christie administration is attempting to help spread the word about the importance of recycling e-scrap and the state's significant steps toward accommodating the process.

"These electronic devices can no longer be placed at the curb for trash pickup," state environmental official Bob Martin told NJ.com. "They can be taken to specially designated e-waste recycling drop-off points conveniently located in our cities and towns or to retailers that accept these materials."

Under the state's e-scrap law, which went into effect as Christie assumed the governorship in 2010, residents are required to recycle many of their used electronics free of charge by dropping them off at retailers, such as Best Buy, UPS and Target, or municipal collection sites. Most electronic items, including televisions, computers and tablets, are covered under the state program. Residents are only encouraged – not required – to recycle some other products, such as cell phones, DVDs, VCRs, video game consoles.

Electronics manufacturers are tasked with funding the recycling program and thus far, state officials say, the program has been a major success. But with e-scrap volumes continuing to climb and the holiday season just wrapping up, state officials are trying to ensure that the program continues to be a success through its public awareness campaigns and website, which provides a full list of drop-off locations throughout the state. Hundreds of locations have been added since the program began in 2010.

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Posted by on in E-Waste News

This holiday season, as you upgrade that old smartphone, pause a moment to reflect on an unexpected fact: In 2012, developing nations -- including China, India, Brazil, and Russia -- tossed out more e-waste (25.4 million tons) than the world’s developed nations, including the U.S., Japan, and the European Union (23.5 million tons).

Posted by on in E-Waste News

As the e-scrap stream has grown and changed, both laws and certification systems are attempting to keep up.

Jean Cox-Kearns
“We’d like to achieve a closed loop—it’s our aspirational goal,” said Jean Cox-Kearns, the Ireland-based Director of Compliance for Dell Global Takeback, part of computer maker Dell Inc., Round Rock, Texas.

Posted by on in E-Waste News

R2 Solutions and Greeneye Partners have released a new guidance document intended to help companies conform to the new R2:2013 standard.

The 58-page guidance document provides best practices on how facilities can implement the principles described in the R2:2013 certification, as well as clarifications and standard interpretations of the language in the certification. For example, the guidance document specifically states that R2 certification is facility-specific, a mention that is a direct response to the growing concern that some processors obtain R2 certification at one facility and claim to be an "R2 processor" while their other processing facilities do not meet the standards of the certification.

The average value of metals commonly found in scrap circuit boards was down by a dime in October, continuing a slide from the previous month.

The scrap circuit board index, which measures the value of commodity metals proportionally weighted to their share in a pound of scrap circuit boards, declined to $6.52 per pound in October. Copper prices stabilized last month, but slumping prices for gold, silver and other precious metals dragged the index lower.

Posted by on in E-Waste News


Beginning next week, Accurate IT Services will be located at 3854 Fisher Rd. Columbus, OH 43228. We will be moving into a larger facility that will better suit our operation as an electronics recycling and refurbishment company.

The new location’s hours of operation are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. We will be accepting e-waste drop-offs at our main office located at the end of the facility. Our new facility will also soon feature a retail store, showcasing our refurbished LCD monitors, computers, laptops, and televisions.

Recycling Today Staff

JUNE 4, 2013

A report conducted by John Dunham and Associates, Brooklyn, N.Y., and released by the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI), Washington, D.C., highlights the relationship between economic growth and electronic scrap export activity. According to the report, a ban on the export of electronic scrap would result in less competition, reduce jobs and increase the costs of consumers.

“By Adam Minter - May 26, 2013

Every year, Americans toss out as much as 4.5 million tons of old mobile phones, laptops, televisions, Xboxes and other electronic gadgets

Some is recycled; some is repaired and refurbished for reuse; and some is thrown into landfills or incinerators. Almost none of it, however, is “dumped” overseas.

That, at least, is the conclusion of the first comprehensive survey of what happens to U.S. e-waste after it is dropped into a recycling bin. Published in February, the study by the U.S. International Trade Commission surveyed 5,200 businesses involved in the e-waste industry (companies that received the survey were required by law to complete it, and to do so accurately), and found that almost 83 percent of what was put into American recycling bins in 2011 was repaired, dismantled or recycled domestically.

"By Cindy Miller, Published May 26, 2013 – IT Asset Disposition Blog

When your company turns its retired IT equipment over to a vendor for asset remarketing, what happens to the equipment that vendor can’t sell as a working asset? It’s a more important question than you might think. As you know, the market for used IT assets is fickle and very dependent on trends. If too many of a certain piece of equipment flood the market—because an upgrade has become available, for example—it can be difficult to sell that piece of equipment for a profitable price. But if it doesn’t sell, something must be done with it. Your company, as the original owner of the equipment, may still be liable if it is disposed of improperly. Whether your company’s IT assets are collected by recycler or a remarketer, it’s crucial you understand their entire process through to the final disposition of your assets. The cost of environmental non-compliance is too high not to do your homework.

Posted by on in E-Waste News

As Rep. Gene Green prepares to reintroduce the Responsible Electronics Recycling Act, a recent study says such legislation would generate numerous jobs in the U.S. However, the proposed legislation still has detractors.

Curt Harler – Recycling Today

APRIL 1, 2013

Electronics are part of our everyday waste stream. Many government officials say they feel the improper disposal of such devices presents a risk to both American jobs and to the world’s environment.

To that end, a bill known as the Responsible Electronics Recycling Act (RERA) was introduced in Congress as HR 2284 in June 2011 by Texas Rep. Gene Green, a Democrat, with 14 Republicans and nine Democrats signing on as co-sponsors. However, it died in committee. According to his office, Green will reintroduce the measure in this session of Congress. The bill restricts exports of untested and nonworking electronics from the U.S. to developing countries, though it would still allow free trade of tested and working used electronics being exported for reuse.

Posted by on in E-Waste News

April is just around the corner and with it comes the beginning of Accurate IT Services’ Community Recycling Events. With over a dozen e-waste events scheduled for 2013 already, Accurate IT will surely be in your area to responsibly recycle your old electronics.

For all of our community e-waste recycling events, we accept all electronics, including, but not limited to, old IT equipment, consumer electronics, and small household appliances. We will be accepting all electronic items free of charge, excluding CRT televisions, which has a $15 per unit fee associated with them. We will also not be accepting items containing Freon or Mercury.

For some products, recycling is more involved than finding your closest blue bin. This is especially true with electronics recycling, where a little research is required to make sure that you are recycling products responsibly.

Increased government regulation and official certification of recyclers both help make this possible.

Of all the products brought to market each year, none render their previous iterations obsolete faster than electronics equipment. With technology often evolving faster than perceived market demand, electronics have officially become the largest growing recyclable material in the U.S., with over 7 million tons of electronics equipment available for recycling each year.

But with great technology comes great responsibility, as the recycling process for a desktop computer is more complicated than that of an aluminum can. Recyclers must separate the glass, metals and plastics and find a recycling market for all these individual recovered materials.

Electronics recyclers also must take special care to ensure that any hazardous substances or residues removed during the recycling process (such as batteries, leaded-glass, and mercury) are recovered safely and recycled.

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